• What is abstract thinking?

    Andy McIntosh, Emeritus Chair in Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory, University of Leeds, answers the question "What is abstract thinking?" related to his talk "Science, Mathematics, and Beauty" given at the 2016 European Leadership Forum. - See more at www.FOCLonline.org FOCLID 7664_1

    published: 13 Oct 2016
  • What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

    How do you go from a concrete object like a basketball to an abstract idea like a circle? Why do you see the one and think about the other? What makes this kind of thing useful? Abstract thinking allows us to identify patterns and see common features. Once we abstract away the differences, we can group the similarities to come up with a new idea all its own. In just a few spare minutes, let's take a tour of the skills involved in this thought process and consider some practical applications. Text + video version: http://www.nativlang.com/logic/thinking-abstract.php Music by nativlang

    published: 08 Jan 2014
  • 4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

    Are numbers, sets, colours and Hamlet really objects? Are they abstract? What does that mean? Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvoAL-KSZ32cX32PRBl1D4b4wr8DwhRQ4 Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube Suggested Reading: David Lewis, On The Plurality of Worlds That awesome comment from Critical Lit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzUrVeIdIBM&google_comment_id=z12awpzzbw3oitxby04cgtyifrnytpj5wfk If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to th...

    published: 03 Oct 2014
  • Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

    What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and ...

    published: 23 May 2017
  • Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

    Getting smart - abstract thinking part 1. The way of thinking abstract. This can be fun if you do it. This video is brought to you by http://www.slackhax.com

    published: 21 Jul 2009
  • Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

    Professor Seff emphasizes that Understanding Math comes from the use of Abstract Thinking

    published: 15 Mar 2010
  • The complete lack to think abstractly

    A talk with my mom

    published: 26 Nov 2013
  • Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

    Po-Shen Loh is a Hertz Foundation Fellow and Carnegie Mellon mathematics professor who thinks that history is a much harder subject than math. Do you agree? Well, your position on that might change before and after this video. Loh illuminates the invisible ladders within the world of math, and shows that it isn't about memorizing formulas—it's about processing reason and logic. With the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, Po-Shen Loh pursued a PhD in combinatorics at the Pure Math Department at Princeton University. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million i...

    published: 19 Mar 2017
  • Abstraction - Computational Thinking

    http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu Learn about what abstraction is and how it helps us to solve problems.

    published: 24 Feb 2016
  • Thinking Abstractly: An Abstract Doodle

    Been a while since I've made an abstract drawing. And thus, another abstract video is born ;) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezigningart?ref_type=bookmark Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leonmoyer/dezigningartcom/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/dezigningart Purchase anything on Amazon to support my channel with this link - no additional cost to you: http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=trespe101-20&linkId=Z3NMN2OUI4WKDGG3

    published: 07 Apr 2015
  • 5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

    View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.

    published: 15 Mar 2016
  • SMP #2 - Thinking Abstractly

    Description

    published: 19 Feb 2015
  • Thinking Abstractly: Making Shapes

    In this video I create another one of my abstract little doodles. It's hard to tell how they'll turn out when I start, because I never really have a vision in mind. I tend to add more as I go along. In any case, I hope you all enjoyed watching! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezigningart?ref_type=bookmark Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leonmoyer/dezigningartcom/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/dezigningart Purchase anything on Amazon to support my channel with this link - no additional cost to you: http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=trespe101-20&linkId=Z3NMN2OUI4WKDGG3

    published: 14 Apr 2015
  • Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

    http://ThriveToInfinity.com Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

    published: 02 Oct 2015
  • Crystallized Vs. Fluid Intelligence

    Correction: Fluid intelligence is just the ability to think and reason abstractly. The higher your fluid intelligence, in theory, the faster and more efficient you become at thinking abstractly. One study shows that people with very high fluid intelligence have closer connections between neurons which allows them to reach conclusions faster. Another shows that the brain organizes itself in a more efficient manner allowing them to use less brain power to reach the same conclusions someone of lower intelligence would take longer to come to.

    published: 30 Dec 2010
  • The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone | TEDxOxford

    The theme for TEDxOxford in 2016 was “find X”. In his talk “the Science of Dubstep”, James Humberstone proposes that if this and future generations are going to “find X”, every nation needs to revolutionise education and develop cohorts of workers who can think abstractly. A composer, technologist, musicologist and music educator, Humberstone claims that music is the most abstract of all the arts and that technologically rich, culturally appropriate musical training could lead that educational revolution, turning the focus away from high stakes standardised testing and toward engaging and inspiring student-centred learning. Along the way he explains how incredible human perception of sound is, and composes a 12-tone dubstep song with the help of the TED audience! As a composer, technologi...

    published: 02 May 2016
What is abstract thinking?

What is abstract thinking?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:04
  • Updated: 13 Oct 2016
  • views: 119
videos
Andy McIntosh, Emeritus Chair in Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory, University of Leeds, answers the question "What is abstract thinking?" related to his talk "Science, Mathematics, and Beauty" given at the 2016 European Leadership Forum. - See more at www.FOCLonline.org FOCLID 7664_1
https://wn.com/What_Is_Abstract_Thinking
What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:21
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2014
  • views: 5542
videos
How do you go from a concrete object like a basketball to an abstract idea like a circle? Why do you see the one and think about the other? What makes this kind of thing useful? Abstract thinking allows us to identify patterns and see common features. Once we abstract away the differences, we can group the similarities to come up with a new idea all its own. In just a few spare minutes, let's take a tour of the skills involved in this thought process and consider some practical applications. Text + video version: http://www.nativlang.com/logic/thinking-abstract.php Music by nativlang
https://wn.com/What's_The_Pattern_Here_Thinking_With_Abstractions_Linguistics_Logic_101
4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:26
  • Updated: 03 Oct 2014
  • views: 21114
videos
Are numbers, sets, colours and Hamlet really objects? Are they abstract? What does that mean? Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvoAL-KSZ32cX32PRBl1D4b4wr8DwhRQ4 Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube Suggested Reading: David Lewis, On The Plurality of Worlds That awesome comment from Critical Lit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzUrVeIdIBM&google_comment_id=z12awpzzbw3oitxby04cgtyifrnytpj5wfk If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to those who might not otherwise have access to it in exchange for credits on the show, please get in touch! Music: 'Show your Moves' and 'Pamgea' by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Any copyrighted material should fall under fair use for educational purposes or commentary, but if you are a copyright holder and believe your material has been used unfairly please get in touch with us and we will be happy to discuss it.
https://wn.com/4_Ways_Of_Thinking_About_Abstract_Objects_Philosophy_Tube
Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:20
  • Updated: 23 May 2017
  • views: 2884
videos
What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and algebra specifically) to develop abstract thinking skills. #4. Find the field in which you belong, and start to chip away at change. Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/hey-bill-nye-what-if-im-not-a-science-person Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript: Caitlin: Hey Bill. I’m currently a junior in high school and I’m getting ready to apply to college in the near future. I’ve always loved science but it’s never been a subject to come naturally to me and I’ve always struggled in it a little bit. Do you think that there’s a possibility I could pick science as my major and become hopefully a scientist one day in the future despite the fact that it doesn’t come naturally to me? Thank you very much. Bill Nye: Caitlin, of course there’s a chance for you to become a scientist. What, are you kidding me? Of course, young woman, go for it! There’s all sorts of sciences that I bet will come naturally to you. Chemistry and physics may not be your thing, or maybe they’re your favorite. Statistics always made me crazy although I did it. So yes, there’s a science for you, you’re doggone right. I would please consider pursuing as many science courses as you can handle. You don’t have to start with 400-level courses, you know, senior in college level courses, just try astronomy. Astronomy is empowering and wonderful. It’s humbling and empowering all at the same time. Try biology. The discoveries being made in genetics right now are amazing and will change the course of human history. Try chemistry. Without chemistry we would not have these textiles and this fabulous glass in these electronics that are enabling us to have this computer conversation. No, just go for it, of course! The big thing I remind everybody though is algebra. Algebra is really important and it was hard for me too. You’ve just got to practice. You’ve got to practice algebra over and over. And the reason it’s valuable, apparently, research suggests thinking abstractly about numbers enables you to think abstractly about all sorts of things. So go back if you need to. If you’re a junior just do a little more algebra and I bet you’re more comfortable with the whole idea. And you might change the world. Go get 'em, Caitlin!
https://wn.com/Study_Science,_Think_Abstractly,_Change_The_World_|_Bill_Nye
Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:27
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2009
  • views: 6032
videos
Getting smart - abstract thinking part 1. The way of thinking abstract. This can be fun if you do it. This video is brought to you by http://www.slackhax.com
https://wn.com/Getting_Smart_Episode_Two_Abstract_Thinking_Part_1
Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:15
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2010
  • views: 19411
videos
Professor Seff emphasizes that Understanding Math comes from the use of Abstract Thinking
https://wn.com/Understanding_Math_By_Using_Abstract_Thinking
The complete lack to think abstractly

The complete lack to think abstractly

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:44
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2013
  • views: 70
videos
A talk with my mom
https://wn.com/The_Complete_Lack_To_Think_Abstractly
Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:53
  • Updated: 19 Mar 2017
  • views: 8687
videos
Po-Shen Loh is a Hertz Foundation Fellow and Carnegie Mellon mathematics professor who thinks that history is a much harder subject than math. Do you agree? Well, your position on that might change before and after this video. Loh illuminates the invisible ladders within the world of math, and shows that it isn't about memorizing formulas—it's about processing reason and logic. With the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, Po-Shen Loh pursued a PhD in combinatorics at the Pure Math Department at Princeton University. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million in Hertz Fellows since 1963 (present value) and supported over 1,100 brilliant and creative young scientists, who have gone on to become Nobel laureates, high-ranking military personnel, astronauts, inventors, Silicon Valley leaders, and tenured university professors. For more information, visit hertzfoundation.org. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/po-shen-loh-says-anyone-can-be-a-math-person-if-they-know-the-best-learning-techniques Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I think that everyone in the world could be a math person if they wanted to. The keyword though, I want to say, is if they wanted to. That said, I do think that everyone in America could benefit from having that mathematical background in reasoning just to help everyone make very good decisions. And here I'm distinguishing already between math as people usually conceive of it, and decision making and analysis, which is actually what I think math is. So, for example, I don't think that being a math person means that you can recite the formulas between the sines, cosines, tangents and to use logarithms and exponentials interchangeably. That's not necessarily what I think everyone should try to concentrate to understand. The main things to concentrate to understand are the mathematical principles of reasoning. But let me go back to these sines, cosines and logarithms. Well actually they do have value. What they are is that they are ways to show you how these basic building blocks of reasoning can be used to deduce surprising things or difficult things. In some sense they're like the historical coverages of the triumphs of mathematics, so one cannot just talk abstractly about “yes let's talk about mathematical logic”, it's actually quite useful to have case studies or stories, which are these famous theorems. Now, I actually think that these are accessible to everyone. I think that actually one reason mathematics is difficult to understand is actually because of that network of prerequisites. You see, math is one of these strange subjects for which the concepts are chained in sequences of dependencies. When you have long chains there are very few starting points—very few things I need to memorize. I don't need to memorize, for example, all these things in history such as “when was the war of 1812?” Well actually I know that one, because that's a math fact—it was 1812—but I can't tell you a lot of other facts, which are just purely memorized. In mathematics you have very few that you memorize and the rest you deduce as you go through, and this chain of deductions is actually what's critical. Now, let me contrast that with other subjects like say history. History doesn't have this long chain, in fact if you fully understand the war of 1812 that's great, and it is true that that will influence perhaps your understanding later of the women's movement, but it won't to be as absolutely prerequisite. In the sense that if you think about the concepts I actually think that history has more concepts than mathematics; it's just that they're spread out broader and they don't depend on each other as strongly. So, for example, if you miss a week you will miss the understanding of one unit, but that won't stop you from understanding all of the rest of the components. So that's actually the difference between math and other subjects in my head. Math has fewer concepts but they're chained deeper. And because of the way that we usually learn when you had deep chains it's very fragile because you lose any one link—meaning if you miss a few concepts along the chain you can actually be completely lost. If, for example, you're sick for a week, or if your mind is somewhere else for a week, you might make a hole in your prerequisites. And the way that education often works where it's almost like riding a train from a beginning to an end, well it's such that if you have a hole somewhere in your track the train is not going to pass that hole.
https://wn.com/Anyone_Can_Be_A_Math_Person_Once_They_Know_The_Best_Learning_Techniques_|_Po_Shen_Loh
Abstraction - Computational Thinking

Abstraction - Computational Thinking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:29
  • Updated: 24 Feb 2016
  • views: 4564
videos
http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu Learn about what abstraction is and how it helps us to solve problems.
https://wn.com/Abstraction_Computational_Thinking
Thinking Abstractly: An Abstract Doodle

Thinking Abstractly: An Abstract Doodle

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:24
  • Updated: 07 Apr 2015
  • views: 320
videos
Been a while since I've made an abstract drawing. And thus, another abstract video is born ;) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezigningart?ref_type=bookmark Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leonmoyer/dezigningartcom/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/dezigningart Purchase anything on Amazon to support my channel with this link - no additional cost to you: http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=trespe101-20&linkId=Z3NMN2OUI4WKDGG3
https://wn.com/Thinking_Abstractly_An_Abstract_Doodle
5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:30
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2016
  • views: 1620644
videos
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.
https://wn.com/5_Tips_To_Improve_Your_Critical_Thinking_Samantha_Agoos
SMP #2 - Thinking Abstractly

SMP #2 - Thinking Abstractly

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:31
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2015
  • views: 28
videos https://wn.com/Smp_2_Thinking_Abstractly
Thinking Abstractly: Making Shapes

Thinking Abstractly: Making Shapes

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:06
  • Updated: 14 Apr 2015
  • views: 43
videos
In this video I create another one of my abstract little doodles. It's hard to tell how they'll turn out when I start, because I never really have a vision in mind. I tend to add more as I go along. In any case, I hope you all enjoyed watching! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezigningart?ref_type=bookmark Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leonmoyer/dezigningartcom/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/dezigningart Purchase anything on Amazon to support my channel with this link - no additional cost to you: http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=trespe101-20&linkId=Z3NMN2OUI4WKDGG3
https://wn.com/Thinking_Abstractly_Making_Shapes
Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:12
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2015
  • views: 83
videos
http://ThriveToInfinity.com Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method
https://wn.com/Psychological_Financial_Blockages,_Ability_To_Think_Abstractly_And_Clearly_Yuen_Method
Crystallized Vs. Fluid Intelligence

Crystallized Vs. Fluid Intelligence

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:21
  • Updated: 30 Dec 2010
  • views: 21730
videos
Correction: Fluid intelligence is just the ability to think and reason abstractly. The higher your fluid intelligence, in theory, the faster and more efficient you become at thinking abstractly. One study shows that people with very high fluid intelligence have closer connections between neurons which allows them to reach conclusions faster. Another shows that the brain organizes itself in a more efficient manner allowing them to use less brain power to reach the same conclusions someone of lower intelligence would take longer to come to.
https://wn.com/Crystallized_Vs._Fluid_Intelligence
The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone | TEDxOxford

The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone | TEDxOxford

  • Order:
  • Duration: 18:07
  • Updated: 02 May 2016
  • views: 13584
videos
The theme for TEDxOxford in 2016 was “find X”. In his talk “the Science of Dubstep”, James Humberstone proposes that if this and future generations are going to “find X”, every nation needs to revolutionise education and develop cohorts of workers who can think abstractly. A composer, technologist, musicologist and music educator, Humberstone claims that music is the most abstract of all the arts and that technologically rich, culturally appropriate musical training could lead that educational revolution, turning the focus away from high stakes standardised testing and toward engaging and inspiring student-centred learning. Along the way he explains how incredible human perception of sound is, and composes a 12-tone dubstep song with the help of the TED audience! As a composer, technologist and teacher, James Humberstone believes that music education can lead all education through the challenges of the 21st Century. After all, there is no more experiential, creative, child-centred subject than music – or so he claims. A trained ‘classical’ composer, James migrated to Sydney, Australia in 1997 and has also worked in the fields of music software, education (with children and adults of all ages), and as a musicologist. Today he is a lecturer in music education at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, and remains an active composer. His recent musical output included a permanent electro-acoustic installation at the Australian National Maritime Museum on board a retired destroyer and a submarine. In 2016 James is collaborating on a Hip Hop album, and composing a song cycle. He has also just released the University of Sydney’s first (free) MOOC, “The Place of Music in 21st Century Education” at www.coursera.org. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/The_Science_Of_Dubstep_|_James_Humberstone_|_Tedxoxford
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