• What is abstract thinking?

    Andy McIntosh, Emeritus Chair in Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory, University of Leeds, answers the question "What is abstract thinking?" related to his talk "Science, Mathematics, and Beauty" given at the 2016 European Leadership Forum. - See more at www.FOCLonline.org FOCLID 7664_1

    published: 13 Oct 2016
  • What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

    How do you go from a concrete object like a basketball to an abstract idea like a circle? Why do you see the one and think about the other? What makes this kind of thing useful? Abstract thinking allows us to identify patterns and see common features. Once we abstract away the differences, we can group the similarities to come up with a new idea all its own. In just a few spare minutes, let's take a tour of the skills involved in this thought process and consider some practical applications. Text + video version: http://www.nativlang.com/logic/thinking-abstract.php Music by nativlang

    published: 08 Jan 2014
  • Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

    Getting smart - abstract thinking part 1. The way of thinking abstract. This can be fun if you do it. This video is brought to you by http://www.slackhax.com

    published: 21 Jul 2009
  • Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

    What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and ...

    published: 23 May 2017
  • 4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

    Are numbers, sets, colours and Hamlet really objects? Are they abstract? What does that mean? Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvoAL-KSZ32cX32PRBl1D4b4wr8DwhRQ4 Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube Suggested Reading: David Lewis, On The Plurality of Worlds That awesome comment from Critical Lit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzUrVeIdIBM&google_comment_id=z12awpzzbw3oitxby04cgtyifrnytpj5wfk If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to th...

    published: 03 Oct 2014
  • Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

    Professor Seff emphasizes that Understanding Math comes from the use of Abstract Thinking

    published: 15 Mar 2010
  • The complete lack to think abstractly

    A talk with my mom

    published: 26 Nov 2013
  • Inside Out - Abstract Thought

    published: 29 Jun 2016
  • 1/6 The Rules Of Abstraction With Matthew Collings

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bg3oQ_OqQ_o&list=PLM4S2hGZDSE5SOht-nruKVOvuR5lrCw2T&index=1 First broadcast: Sep 2014. Documentary in which painter and critic Matthew Collings charts the rise of abstract art over the last 100 years, whilst trying to answer a set of basic questions that many people have about this often-baffling art form. How do we respond to abstract art when we see it? Is it supposed to be hard or easy? When abstract artists chuck paint about with abandon, what does it mean? Does abstract art stand for something or is it supposed to be understood as just itself? These might be thought of as unanswerable questions, but by looking at key historical figures and exploring the private world of abstract artists today, Collings shows that there are, in fact, answers. Living ar...

    published: 12 Sep 2014
  • Inside the minds of animals - Bryan B Rasmussen

    View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/inside-the-minds-of-animals-bryan-b-rasmussen Do animals think? It’s a question that has intrigued scientists for thousands of years, inspiring them to come up with different methods and criteria to measure the intelligence of animals. Bryan B Rasmussen navigates through this controversial question, showing how determining intelligence often says more about how humans think than about anything else. Lesson by Bryan B Rasmussen, animation by Mike Schell.

    published: 14 Jul 2015
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson: How to Teach Science? Leverage the Power of Pop Culture

    Pop culture is a great way to frame new information. And a teacher like Neil can make a huge difference. Why spend hours explaining something in great detail when you can simply use what they already know? Pop culture is a great scaffold to build and hang information off of argues Neil deGrasse Tyson. For example: you need to understand basic laws of gravity in order to play Angry Birds, so why spend hours explaining Newton's Law when you can just fling a red bird at a pig? In this video, Neil uses a great anecdote about watching a football game and realizing that physics and science play a huge part in it whether the audience knows it or not. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/neil-degrasse-tyson-the-best-tactic-for-science-education-leverage-the-power-of-pop-culture ...

    published: 09 Jul 2017
  • SMP #2 - Thinking Abstractly

    Description

    published: 19 Feb 2015
  • Goal Setting Is a Hamster Wheel. Learn to Set Systems Instead. | Adam Alter

    You've just achieved a goal you've been working towards for two years. You did it! Congratulations. Someone asks you: how does it feel? "Kind of anti-climactic, actually," you say. This scenario is quite common among those who have achieved even the highest benchmarks in business, athletics, or art, says Adam Alter, and it's because the goal setting process is broken. With long-term goals particularly, you spend the large majority of the time in a failure state, awaiting what could be a mere second of success down the track. This can be a hollow and unrewarding process. Alter suggests swapping quantitative goals (I will write 1,000 words of my novel per day. I will run 1km further every week) for qualitative systems—like writing every morning with no word target, or running in a new enviro...

    published: 21 Jun 2017
  • How formal clothes can impact our psychology

    What we wear can be a form of self-expression, but how much do your clothes reveal about you? A recent study finds that wearing formal clothing can actually enhance your ability to think abstractly. Heidi Grant Halvorson, social psychologist and author of “No One Understands You and What To Do About It,” joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss the study.

    published: 02 Jul 2015
  • 5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

    View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.

    published: 15 Mar 2016
  • Th!nk - Abstract - All Answers

    www.levelswalkthrough.com

    published: 02 May 2015
  • Concrete Operational Stage Abstract Thinking (Love)

    published: 02 Oct 2014
  • Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

    http://ThriveToInfinity.com Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

    published: 02 Oct 2015
  • Thinking Abstractly: An Abstract Doodle

    Been a while since I've made an abstract drawing. And thus, another abstract video is born ;) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezigningart?ref_type=bookmark Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leonmoyer/dezigningartcom/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/dezigningart Purchase anything on Amazon to support my channel with this link - no additional cost to you: http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=trespe101-20&linkId=Z3NMN2OUI4WKDGG3

    published: 07 Apr 2015
  • Abstract thinking test: How many numbers can you see?

    Simple test of the ability to quickly identify patterns (numbers in this case). --- Note: This is an approximation only, not a sample from real test. --- Subscribe!

    published: 06 Jun 2016
  • Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

    Po-Shen Loh is a Hertz Foundation Fellow and Carnegie Mellon mathematics professor who thinks that history is a much harder subject than math. Do you agree? Well, your position on that might change before and after this video. Loh illuminates the invisible ladders within the world of math, and shows that it isn't about memorizing formulas—it's about processing reason and logic. With the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, Po-Shen Loh pursued a PhD in combinatorics at the Pure Math Department at Princeton University. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million i...

    published: 19 Mar 2017
  • Why Schools Should Teach Skepticism Above Obedience | Lawrence Krauss

    “You can can get more information in your cell phone now than you can in any school, but you can also get more misinformation,” says American-Canadian theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss. And he’s right: we’re in an era where any human can access a previously unimaginable wealth of knowledge. This access has grown faster than our ability to process it critically, however, and what we lack is any decent filter to weed out erroneous or partisan information. Children are the most susceptible to this, and Krauss argues that teaching children how to question information—essentially, how to make children skeptics—may save humanity from a dumbing-down. Lawrence Krauss' most recent book is The Greatest Story Ever Told -- So Far: Why Are We Here? Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/vi...

    published: 02 Jun 2017
  • Abstraction - Computational Thinking

    http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu Learn about what abstraction is and how it helps us to solve problems.

    published: 24 Feb 2016
  • Abstraction - A Programming Concept

    Today, we approach, and attempt to understand, one of the higher-level programming concepts - Abstraction. = 0612 TV = 0612 TV, a sub-project of NERDfirst.net, is an educational YouTube channel. Started in 2008, we have now covered a wide range of topics, from areas such as Programming, Algorithms and Computing Theories, Computer Graphics, Photography, and Specialized Guides for using software such as FFMPEG, Deshaker, GIMP and more! Enjoy your stay, and don't hesitate to drop me a comment or a personal message to my inbox =) If you like my work, don't forget to subscribe! Like what you see? Buy me a coffee → http://www.nerdfirst.net/donate/ 0612 TV Official Writeup: http://nerdfirst.net/0612tv More about me: http://about.me/lcc0612 Official Twitter: http://twitter.com/0612tv = NERDfi...

    published: 09 Apr 2014
developed with YouTube
What is abstract thinking?

What is abstract thinking?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:04
  • Updated: 13 Oct 2016
  • views: 9148
videos
Andy McIntosh, Emeritus Chair in Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory, University of Leeds, answers the question "What is abstract thinking?" related to his talk "Science, Mathematics, and Beauty" given at the 2016 European Leadership Forum. - See more at www.FOCLonline.org FOCLID 7664_1
https://wn.com/What_Is_Abstract_Thinking
What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:21
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2014
  • views: 10567
videos
How do you go from a concrete object like a basketball to an abstract idea like a circle? Why do you see the one and think about the other? What makes this kind of thing useful? Abstract thinking allows us to identify patterns and see common features. Once we abstract away the differences, we can group the similarities to come up with a new idea all its own. In just a few spare minutes, let's take a tour of the skills involved in this thought process and consider some practical applications. Text + video version: http://www.nativlang.com/logic/thinking-abstract.php Music by nativlang
https://wn.com/What's_The_Pattern_Here_Thinking_With_Abstractions_Linguistics_Logic_101
Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:27
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2009
  • views: 7892
videos
Getting smart - abstract thinking part 1. The way of thinking abstract. This can be fun if you do it. This video is brought to you by http://www.slackhax.com
https://wn.com/Getting_Smart_Episode_Two_Abstract_Thinking_Part_1
Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:20
  • Updated: 23 May 2017
  • views: 28297
videos
What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and algebra specifically) to develop abstract thinking skills. #4. Find the field in which you belong, and start to chip away at change. Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/hey-bill-nye-what-if-im-not-a-science-person Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript: Caitlin: Hey Bill. I’m currently a junior in high school and I’m getting ready to apply to college in the near future. I’ve always loved science but it’s never been a subject to come naturally to me and I’ve always struggled in it a little bit. Do you think that there’s a possibility I could pick science as my major and become hopefully a scientist one day in the future despite the fact that it doesn’t come naturally to me? Thank you very much. Bill Nye: Caitlin, of course there’s a chance for you to become a scientist. What, are you kidding me? Of course, young woman, go for it! There’s all sorts of sciences that I bet will come naturally to you. Chemistry and physics may not be your thing, or maybe they’re your favorite. Statistics always made me crazy although I did it. So yes, there’s a science for you, you’re doggone right. I would please consider pursuing as many science courses as you can handle. You don’t have to start with 400-level courses, you know, senior in college level courses, just try astronomy. Astronomy is empowering and wonderful. It’s humbling and empowering all at the same time. Try biology. The discoveries being made in genetics right now are amazing and will change the course of human history. Try chemistry. Without chemistry we would not have these textiles and this fabulous glass in these electronics that are enabling us to have this computer conversation. No, just go for it, of course! The big thing I remind everybody though is algebra. Algebra is really important and it was hard for me too. You’ve just got to practice. You’ve got to practice algebra over and over. And the reason it’s valuable, apparently, research suggests thinking abstractly about numbers enables you to think abstractly about all sorts of things. So go back if you need to. If you’re a junior just do a little more algebra and I bet you’re more comfortable with the whole idea. And you might change the world. Go get 'em, Caitlin!
https://wn.com/Study_Science,_Think_Abstractly,_Change_The_World_|_Bill_Nye
4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:26
  • Updated: 03 Oct 2014
  • views: 28778
videos
Are numbers, sets, colours and Hamlet really objects? Are they abstract? What does that mean? Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvoAL-KSZ32cX32PRBl1D4b4wr8DwhRQ4 Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube Suggested Reading: David Lewis, On The Plurality of Worlds That awesome comment from Critical Lit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzUrVeIdIBM&google_comment_id=z12awpzzbw3oitxby04cgtyifrnytpj5wfk If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to those who might not otherwise have access to it in exchange for credits on the show, please get in touch! Music: 'Show your Moves' and 'Pamgea' by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Any copyrighted material should fall under fair use for educational purposes or commentary, but if you are a copyright holder and believe your material has been used unfairly please get in touch with us and we will be happy to discuss it.
https://wn.com/4_Ways_Of_Thinking_About_Abstract_Objects_Philosophy_Tube
Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:15
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2010
  • views: 26998
videos
Professor Seff emphasizes that Understanding Math comes from the use of Abstract Thinking
https://wn.com/Understanding_Math_By_Using_Abstract_Thinking
The complete lack to think abstractly

The complete lack to think abstractly

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:44
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2013
  • views: 81
videos
A talk with my mom
https://wn.com/The_Complete_Lack_To_Think_Abstractly
Inside Out - Abstract Thought

Inside Out - Abstract Thought

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:12
  • Updated: 29 Jun 2016
  • views: 1494738
videos
https://wn.com/Inside_Out_Abstract_Thought
1/6 The Rules Of Abstraction With Matthew Collings

1/6 The Rules Of Abstraction With Matthew Collings

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:01
  • Updated: 12 Sep 2014
  • views: 446855
videos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bg3oQ_OqQ_o&list=PLM4S2hGZDSE5SOht-nruKVOvuR5lrCw2T&index=1 First broadcast: Sep 2014. Documentary in which painter and critic Matthew Collings charts the rise of abstract art over the last 100 years, whilst trying to answer a set of basic questions that many people have about this often-baffling art form. How do we respond to abstract art when we see it? Is it supposed to be hard or easy? When abstract artists chuck paint about with abandon, what does it mean? Does abstract art stand for something or is it supposed to be understood as just itself? These might be thought of as unanswerable questions, but by looking at key historical figures and exploring the private world of abstract artists today, Collings shows that there are, in fact, answers. Living artists in the programme create art in front of the camera using techniques that seem outrageously free, but through his friendly-yet-probing interview style Collings immediately establishes that the work always has a firm rationale. When Collings visits 92-year-old Bert Irvin in his studio in Stepney, east London he finds that the colourful works continue experiments in perceptual ideas about colour and space first established by abstract art pioneers such as Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky in the 1910s. Other historic artists featured in the programme include the notorious Jackson Pollock, the maker of drip paintings, and Mark Rothko, whose abstractions often consist of nothing but large expanses of red. Collings explains the inner structure of such works. It turns out there are hidden rules to abstraction that viewers of this intriguing, groundbreaking programme may never have expected.
https://wn.com/1_6_The_Rules_Of_Abstraction_With_Matthew_Collings
Inside the minds of animals - Bryan B Rasmussen

Inside the minds of animals - Bryan B Rasmussen

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:13
  • Updated: 14 Jul 2015
  • views: 537441
videos
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/inside-the-minds-of-animals-bryan-b-rasmussen Do animals think? It’s a question that has intrigued scientists for thousands of years, inspiring them to come up with different methods and criteria to measure the intelligence of animals. Bryan B Rasmussen navigates through this controversial question, showing how determining intelligence often says more about how humans think than about anything else. Lesson by Bryan B Rasmussen, animation by Mike Schell.
https://wn.com/Inside_The_Minds_Of_Animals_Bryan_B_Rasmussen
Neil deGrasse Tyson: How to Teach Science? Leverage the Power of Pop Culture

Neil deGrasse Tyson: How to Teach Science? Leverage the Power of Pop Culture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:06
  • Updated: 09 Jul 2017
  • views: 53900
videos
Pop culture is a great way to frame new information. And a teacher like Neil can make a huge difference. Why spend hours explaining something in great detail when you can simply use what they already know? Pop culture is a great scaffold to build and hang information off of argues Neil deGrasse Tyson. For example: you need to understand basic laws of gravity in order to play Angry Birds, so why spend hours explaining Newton's Law when you can just fling a red bird at a pig? In this video, Neil uses a great anecdote about watching a football game and realizing that physics and science play a huge part in it whether the audience knows it or not. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/neil-degrasse-tyson-the-best-tactic-for-science-education-leverage-the-power-of-pop-culture Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I guess I'm lucky that my chosen profession is astrophysics because unlike so many other fields of study, especially academic fields of study, in my field we have an essentially completely transparent lexicon so I don't have to translate anything, hardly anything. If I show you a photograph of the sun and you see spots on the sun you say, "What do you call those?" And I say, "We call them sunspots." I show you a picture of Jupiter, "There's that red spot in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter what do you call that?" "We call that Jupiter's red spot." "There is this place for you to fall in and you don't come out and light doesn't escape what do you guys call that?" "Black hole." So I don't see myself translating anything. I don't have to. I celebrate discovery using all the language that is fundamental to my field and what it means is to the person listening they don't have to slog through, navigate through vocabulary to gain access to the interesting idea that's sitting on the other side of it. So let's take biology, for example. They discovered deoxyribonucleic acid. Now, if you don't know biology these are just syllables coming out of your mouth. Well, what is it? Well, it encodes to the identity of life and it's in the shape of a double helix. So fortunately - double helix - that's a word and there's nothing else really that's a double helix so that's kind of a translated term for deoxyribonucleic acid, but notice you spend all this time just getting through the word before you get to an understanding or a conversation about what it does and how it does it and why. So I'm lucky that my field does not have this lexicon challenge for the educator. But what I also do is I have come to recognize the obvious that everyone exists with a certain pop-culture scaffold that they carry with them. That's the definition of pop culture. So it's not everyone but it's most people. There's a common base of knowledge that we can all reference. We all know what football is in America. We know what we mean when we say football. What is baseball? Who is Beyoncé? Who is Donald Trump? Who is Hillary Clinton? What is the capital building? There are things we just know as part of pop culture. And I say hum, if you already know that then if I clad that… Once I've recognize that you are walking around with a pop-culture scaffold I can then clad that scaffold, if I think about how to do it, I can clad that scaffold with real and genuine science and you will care about it because I'm attaching it to something that I know in advance you already do care about or already do know about. Just as a quick example I was channel surfing, came across a football game that had just ended in a tie; they went into overtime. I had 15 minutes to kill before my movie came on. I said I'll sit there and watch this overtime period. And I'm watching it and there's the requisite exchange of possession before you go into sudden death overtime.
https://wn.com/Neil_Degrasse_Tyson_How_To_Teach_Science_Leverage_The_Power_Of_Pop_Culture
SMP #2 - Thinking Abstractly

SMP #2 - Thinking Abstractly

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:31
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2015
  • views: 31
videos https://wn.com/Smp_2_Thinking_Abstractly
Goal Setting Is a Hamster Wheel. Learn to Set Systems Instead. | Adam Alter

Goal Setting Is a Hamster Wheel. Learn to Set Systems Instead. | Adam Alter

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:50
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2017
  • views: 443481
videos
You've just achieved a goal you've been working towards for two years. You did it! Congratulations. Someone asks you: how does it feel? "Kind of anti-climactic, actually," you say. This scenario is quite common among those who have achieved even the highest benchmarks in business, athletics, or art, says Adam Alter, and it's because the goal setting process is broken. With long-term goals particularly, you spend the large majority of the time in a failure state, awaiting what could be a mere second of success down the track. This can be a hollow and unrewarding process. Alter suggests swapping quantitative goals (I will write 1,000 words of my novel per day. I will run 1km further every week) for qualitative systems—like writing every morning with no word target, or running in a new environment each week—that nourish you psychologically, and are independently rewarding each time you do them. Adam Alter is the author of Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/adam-alter-want-to-succeed-dont-set-goals-set-systems Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript: Goal setting is fascinating because it's sort of a broken process in many respects. This is the way a goal works: You say to yourself, “When I achieve (whatever the thing is), that's how I'll know I'll have succeeded, and I'm going to do everything I can to get to that point as quickly as possible.” What that means is you exist in a failure state for a long time until you reach that goal, if it's a long-range goal. And so as you evaluate your process all you get is the negative feedback of not having achieved that goal. Perhaps as you move closer to it there's some positive feedback, but if the goal is really the end state that you're seeking out, there's a lot of failure before you get there. And now here's the thing: when you do get there it's a massive anti-climax. So there are people who achieve the highest highs; people who achieve the highest highs in athletics, in business, and if you talk to them and you ask them to describe what it's like to reach their goals they say things like, “I got there and it was an incredible anti-climax. The minute I got there I had to start something new, I had to find a new goal.” And that's partly because there's something really unsatisfying about the moment of reaching the goal. Unless it has its own benefits that come from reaching the goal, if it's just a sort of signpost; that doesn't do much for us, it doesn't nourish us psychologically. And what that ends up meaning is that we have to try to find something new. So really if you look at life as a series of goals, which for many of us it is, it's a period of being unsuccessful in achieving the goal, then hitting the goal, then feeling like you haven't really got much from that goal, going to the next one—and it's a sort of series of escalating goals. A really good example of this is, say, smart watches or Fitbits or exercise watches. People, when they get those watches, a lot of them hit on the number 10,000. “I want to walk 10,000 steps.” When you do that, the thing will beep; you'll feel pretty good about it for a minute but then that feels a little hollow and the goal escalates over time. People will describe going from 10 to 11 to 12 to 14,000 steps to the point where they're moving through injuries, through stress-related injuries, because the goal is there; they respond to the goal more than they do to their internal cues, and basically there's something really unfulfilling about that. The reason the goal keeps escalating and becoming more and more intense is because when they achieve the goal they don't actually get anything for that achievement, and so goals, generally I think, are in many ways broken processes. I think part of the problem with goals is that they don't tell you how to get to where you're going. A better thing to do is to use a system. So the idea behind a system rather than a goal is that a system is saying things like, “I’m a writer, my goal is to finish writing this book but I'm not going to think about it in that way. Eventually I'll have 100,000 words, but my system will be that for an hour every morning I will sit in front of my computer screen and I will type. It doesn't matter what that looks like. I'm not going to evaluate the number of words. I'm not going to set some benchmark, some artificial number or benchmark that I should reach, what I'm going to do is just say, 'Here's my system: an hour a day in front of the screen. I'll do what I can—bam.'”
https://wn.com/Goal_Setting_Is_A_Hamster_Wheel._Learn_To_Set_Systems_Instead._|_Adam_Alter
How formal clothes can impact our psychology

How formal clothes can impact our psychology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:17
  • Updated: 02 Jul 2015
  • views: 5626
videos
What we wear can be a form of self-expression, but how much do your clothes reveal about you? A recent study finds that wearing formal clothing can actually enhance your ability to think abstractly. Heidi Grant Halvorson, social psychologist and author of “No One Understands You and What To Do About It,” joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss the study.
https://wn.com/How_Formal_Clothes_Can_Impact_Our_Psychology
5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

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  • Duration: 4:30
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2016
  • views: 3192356
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.
https://wn.com/5_Tips_To_Improve_Your_Critical_Thinking_Samantha_Agoos
Th!nk - Abstract - All Answers

Th!nk - Abstract - All Answers

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  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 02 May 2015
  • views: 3563
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www.levelswalkthrough.com
https://wn.com/Th_Nk_Abstract_All_Answers
Concrete Operational Stage Abstract Thinking (Love)

Concrete Operational Stage Abstract Thinking (Love)

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  • Duration: 0:28
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2014
  • views: 138
videos
https://wn.com/Concrete_Operational_Stage_Abstract_Thinking_(Love)
Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method

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  • Duration: 4:12
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2015
  • views: 126
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http://ThriveToInfinity.com Psychological Financial Blockages, Ability to Think Abstractly and Clearly - Yuen Method
https://wn.com/Psychological_Financial_Blockages,_Ability_To_Think_Abstractly_And_Clearly_Yuen_Method
Thinking Abstractly: An Abstract Doodle

Thinking Abstractly: An Abstract Doodle

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  • Duration: 1:24
  • Updated: 07 Apr 2015
  • views: 546
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Been a while since I've made an abstract drawing. And thus, another abstract video is born ;) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezigningart?ref_type=bookmark Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leonmoyer/dezigningartcom/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/dezigningart Purchase anything on Amazon to support my channel with this link - no additional cost to you: http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=trespe101-20&linkId=Z3NMN2OUI4WKDGG3
https://wn.com/Thinking_Abstractly_An_Abstract_Doodle
Abstract thinking test: How many numbers can you see?

Abstract thinking test: How many numbers can you see?

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  • Duration: 0:29
  • Updated: 06 Jun 2016
  • views: 12358
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Simple test of the ability to quickly identify patterns (numbers in this case). --- Note: This is an approximation only, not a sample from real test. --- Subscribe!
https://wn.com/Abstract_Thinking_Test_How_Many_Numbers_Can_You_See
Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

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  • Duration: 3:53
  • Updated: 19 Mar 2017
  • views: 425004
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Po-Shen Loh is a Hertz Foundation Fellow and Carnegie Mellon mathematics professor who thinks that history is a much harder subject than math. Do you agree? Well, your position on that might change before and after this video. Loh illuminates the invisible ladders within the world of math, and shows that it isn't about memorizing formulas—it's about processing reason and logic. With the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, Po-Shen Loh pursued a PhD in combinatorics at the Pure Math Department at Princeton University. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million in Hertz Fellows since 1963 (present value) and supported over 1,100 brilliant and creative young scientists, who have gone on to become Nobel laureates, high-ranking military personnel, astronauts, inventors, Silicon Valley leaders, and tenured university professors. For more information, visit hertzfoundation.org. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/po-shen-loh-says-anyone-can-be-a-math-person-if-they-know-the-best-learning-techniques Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I think that everyone in the world could be a math person if they wanted to. The keyword though, I want to say, is if they wanted to. That said, I do think that everyone in America could benefit from having that mathematical background in reasoning just to help everyone make very good decisions. And here I'm distinguishing already between math as people usually conceive of it, and decision making and analysis, which is actually what I think math is. So, for example, I don't think that being a math person means that you can recite the formulas between the sines, cosines, tangents and to use logarithms and exponentials interchangeably. That's not necessarily what I think everyone should try to concentrate to understand. The main things to concentrate to understand are the mathematical principles of reasoning. But let me go back to these sines, cosines and logarithms. Well actually they do have value. What they are is that they are ways to show you how these basic building blocks of reasoning can be used to deduce surprising things or difficult things. In some sense they're like the historical coverages of the triumphs of mathematics, so one cannot just talk abstractly about “yes let's talk about mathematical logic”, it's actually quite useful to have case studies or stories, which are these famous theorems. Now, I actually think that these are accessible to everyone. I think that actually one reason mathematics is difficult to understand is actually because of that network of prerequisites. You see, math is one of these strange subjects for which the concepts are chained in sequences of dependencies. When you have long chains there are very few starting points—very few things I need to memorize. I don't need to memorize, for example, all these things in history such as “when was the war of 1812?” Well actually I know that one, because that's a math fact—it was 1812—but I can't tell you a lot of other facts, which are just purely memorized. In mathematics you have very few that you memorize and the rest you deduce as you go through, and this chain of deductions is actually what's critical. Now, let me contrast that with other subjects like say history. History doesn't have this long chain, in fact if you fully understand the war of 1812 that's great, and it is true that that will influence perhaps your understanding later of the women's movement, but it won't to be as absolutely prerequisite. In the sense that if you think about the concepts I actually think that history has more concepts than mathematics; it's just that they're spread out broader and they don't depend on each other as strongly. So, for example, if you miss a week you will miss the understanding of one unit, but that won't stop you from understanding all of the rest of the components. So that's actually the difference between math and other subjects in my head. Math has fewer concepts but they're chained deeper. And because of the way that we usually learn when you had deep chains it's very fragile because you lose any one link—meaning if you miss a few concepts along the chain you can actually be completely lost. If, for example, you're sick for a week, or if your mind is somewhere else for a week, you might make a hole in your prerequisites. And the way that education often works where it's almost like riding a train from a beginning to an end, well it's such that if you have a hole somewhere in your track the train is not going to pass that hole.
https://wn.com/Anyone_Can_Be_A_Math_Person_Once_They_Know_The_Best_Learning_Techniques_|_Po_Shen_Loh
Why Schools Should Teach Skepticism Above Obedience | Lawrence Krauss

Why Schools Should Teach Skepticism Above Obedience | Lawrence Krauss

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  • Duration: 5:38
  • Updated: 02 Jun 2017
  • views: 30122
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“You can can get more information in your cell phone now than you can in any school, but you can also get more misinformation,” says American-Canadian theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss. And he’s right: we’re in an era where any human can access a previously unimaginable wealth of knowledge. This access has grown faster than our ability to process it critically, however, and what we lack is any decent filter to weed out erroneous or partisan information. Children are the most susceptible to this, and Krauss argues that teaching children how to question information—essentially, how to make children skeptics—may save humanity from a dumbing-down. Lawrence Krauss' most recent book is The Greatest Story Ever Told -- So Far: Why Are We Here? Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/lawrence-krauss-why-schools-should-teach-skepticism-above-obedience Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink One of the biggest surprises of the Internet is we thought when the Internet came out it would provide everyone new fundamental tools to learn about the world around them, and it would actually remove the censorship and information that we get. Before the Internet we used to get our news from three TV stations and it was carefully edited and carefully described, and after the Internet came out you could search news sources from around the world—great! The problem is the Internet also became a source of misinformation. There's that very famous cartoon that says, “On the Internet no one knows if you're a dog," with a dog typing on a typewriter. You don't know the source of your information, which is the beauty of it. It was the reason it was actually created by particle physicist working at the Large Hadron Collider, or at least CERN the laboratory where that now is, because thousands of physicists needed to communicate with information without caring about where the source came from. But the fact that the source is shielded is, of course, a great concern nowadays in the political world among other things, and so we have to think about ways that we can address that. Now, of course, information providers can try and work on that too, but we basically all have our own responsibility to become our own filters. And that's why it seems to me the educational system has to provide those tools, those filtering tools. And that's one of the reasons why I think science is so important because of its built-in filtering tools. It recognizes that we all want to believe, and as Richard Feynman said, "The person you have to question most is yourself.” Knowing that you want to believe when you read something that validates your beliefs, you should be skeptical of it and your beliefs and you should look out for other sources. So we have to train people that one source on the Internet is not good enough, you have to search broadly to see if it's validated. More over, you have to empirically test those ideas. If claims are made, you could look out and look at the data to see if those claims are validated. We all have this new responsibility, because we have a sudden wealth of information, to become our own filters. And I can't see any way that we can move into an Internet-guided world where democracy remains vibrant if the public doesn't have the tools to distinguish sense from nonsense. And for me that's one of the reasons why I talk about science, because I think it provides us one of the key tools to do that. One things seems very clear to me: education should not be left to private enterprise anymore than police or fire or military or in my opinion health because they're fundamental rights of people. And in a society that has the financial resources to provide individuals a safe and secure environment, which is really what government is all about, part of that is to educate young people. It's a right for every young person in a society, in a modern advanced industrial society, to receive an education. And that means not that we can't have the option of private education, but we have to ensure that students are provided opportunities to become the most productive adults they can be in a modern complex society. That by the way doesn't mean treating science and other things as purely information, that's a mistake. We used to feel that schools were places that imparted information. Well, I can get more information in my cell phone now than I could in any school, but I could also get more misinformation. What we need to recognize is that science is not just a bunch of facts, but it's a process for deriving facts and it's a process to tell sense from nonsense.
https://wn.com/Why_Schools_Should_Teach_Skepticism_Above_Obedience_|_Lawrence_Krauss
Abstraction - Computational Thinking

Abstraction - Computational Thinking

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  • Duration: 2:29
  • Updated: 24 Feb 2016
  • views: 9138
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http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu Learn about what abstraction is and how it helps us to solve problems.
https://wn.com/Abstraction_Computational_Thinking
Abstraction - A Programming Concept

Abstraction - A Programming Concept

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  • Duration: 7:51
  • Updated: 09 Apr 2014
  • views: 22775
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Today, we approach, and attempt to understand, one of the higher-level programming concepts - Abstraction. = 0612 TV = 0612 TV, a sub-project of NERDfirst.net, is an educational YouTube channel. Started in 2008, we have now covered a wide range of topics, from areas such as Programming, Algorithms and Computing Theories, Computer Graphics, Photography, and Specialized Guides for using software such as FFMPEG, Deshaker, GIMP and more! Enjoy your stay, and don't hesitate to drop me a comment or a personal message to my inbox =) If you like my work, don't forget to subscribe! Like what you see? Buy me a coffee → http://www.nerdfirst.net/donate/ 0612 TV Official Writeup: http://nerdfirst.net/0612tv More about me: http://about.me/lcc0612 Official Twitter: http://twitter.com/0612tv = NERDfirst = NERDfirst is a project allowing me to go above and beyond YouTube videos into areas like app and game development. It will also contain the official 0612 TV blog and other resources. Watch this space, and keep your eyes peeled on this channel for more updates! http://nerdfirst.net/ ----- Disclaimer: Please note that any information is provided on this channel in good faith, but I cannot guarantee 100% accuracy / correctness on all content. Contributors to this channel are not to be held responsible for any possible outcomes from your use of the information.
https://wn.com/Abstraction_A_Programming_Concept
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