• What is abstract thinking?

    Andy McIntosh, Emeritus Chair in Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory, University of Leeds, answers the question "What is abstract thinking?" related to his talk "Science, Mathematics, and Beauty" given at the 2016 European Leadership Forum. - See more at www.FOCLonline.org FOCLID 7664_1

    published: 13 Oct 2016
  • What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

    How do you go from a concrete object like a basketball to an abstract idea like a circle? Why do you see the one and think about the other? What makes this kind of thing useful? Abstract thinking allows us to identify patterns and see common features. Once we abstract away the differences, we can group the similarities to come up with a new idea all its own. In just a few spare minutes, let's take a tour of the skills involved in this thought process and consider some practical applications. Text + video version: http://www.nativlang.com/logic/thinking-abstract.php Music by nativlang

    published: 08 Jan 2014
  • 4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

    Are numbers, sets, colours and Hamlet really objects? Are they abstract? What does that mean? Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvoAL-KSZ32cX32PRBl1D4b4wr8DwhRQ4 Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube Suggested Reading: David Lewis, On The Plurality of Worlds That awesome comment from Critical Lit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzUrVeIdIBM&google_comment_id=z12awpzzbw3oitxby04cgtyifrnytpj5wfk If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to th...

    published: 03 Oct 2014
  • Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

    What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and ...

    published: 23 May 2017
  • Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

    Professor Seff emphasizes that Understanding Math comes from the use of Abstract Thinking

    published: 15 Mar 2010
  • Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

    Getting smart - abstract thinking part 1. The way of thinking abstract. This can be fun if you do it. This video is brought to you by http://www.slackhax.com

    published: 21 Jul 2009
  • Abstract vs. Concrete Thinking..CHECK IT OUT!

    This is a response to a video for a friend of mine subscribe to his channel below ✡ Jeff Brenner --http://goo.gl/pURdVb ✡ Subscribe to my channel! http://goo.gl/seB92J ✡Tweet me! http://www.twitter.com/yirmeyahu23 ✡ Email me! jayvon2305@yahoo.com

    published: 08 Jun 2012
  • 5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

    View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.

    published: 15 Mar 2016
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson: How to Teach Science? Leverage the Power of Pop Culture

    Pop culture is a great way to frame new information. And a teacher like Neil can make a huge difference. Why spend hours explaining something in great detail when you can simply use what they already know? Pop culture is a great scaffold to build and hang information off of argues Neil deGrasse Tyson. For example: you need to understand basic laws of gravity in order to play Angry Birds, so why spend hours explaining Newton's Law when you can just fling a red bird at a pig? In this video, Neil uses a great anecdote about watching a football game and realizing that physics and science play a huge part in it whether the audience knows it or not. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/neil-degrasse-tyson-the-best-tactic-for-science-education-leverage-the-power-of-pop-culture ...

    published: 09 Jul 2017
  • What is Abstract Algebra? (Modern Algebra)

    Abstract Algebra is very different than the algebra most people study in high school. This math subject focuses on abstract structures with names like groups, rings, fields and modules. These structures have applications in many areas of mathematics, and are being used more and more in the sciences, too. ******** If​ ​you​’d​ ​like​ ​to​ ​help​ ​us​ ​make​ ​videos more quickly,​ ​you​ ​can​ ​support​ ​us​ on ​Patreon​ at https://www.patreon.com/socratica We​ ​also​ ​welcome​ ​Bitcoin​ ​donations!​ ​​ ​Our​ ​Bitcoin​ ​address​ ​is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 Thank​ ​you!! ************** We recommend the following textbooks: Dummit & Foote, Abstract Algebra 3rd Edition http://amzn.to/2oOBd5S Milne, Algebra Course Notes (available free online) http://www.jmilne.org/m...

    published: 07 Jul 2016
  • The complete lack to think abstractly

    A talk with my mom

    published: 26 Nov 2013
  • The True Value of Coding: It Teaches You to Think Differently | Gene Luen-Yang

    As a high school teacher for 17 years, Gene Luen-Yang experienced the highs and lows of teaching computer science. Initially offered as a standalone course at Bishop O’Dowd High School, where Luen-Yang taught, faculty came to believe that computer science was so essential that it be integrated into every subject. Still, interest in learning coding among students varied with market fortunes. When the dotcom bubble burst in the late 1990s, fewer students wanted to learn the zen of programming languages. That's a shame, says Luen-Yang, because more than an employable skill, coding is a gateway to using logic to solve large problems creatively. Read more at BigThink.com Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twi...

    published: 03 Jul 2017
  • Goal Setting Is a Hamster Wheel. Learn to Set Systems Instead. | Adam Alter

    You've just achieved a goal you've been working towards for two years. You did it! Congratulations. Someone asks you: how does it feel? "Kind of anti-climactic, actually," you say. This scenario is quite common among those who have achieved even the highest benchmarks in business, athletics, or art, says Adam Alter, and it's because the goal setting process is broken. With long-term goals particularly, you spend the large majority of the time in a failure state, awaiting what could be a mere second of success down the track. This can be a hollow and unrewarding process. Alter suggests swapping quantitative goals (I will write 1,000 words of my novel per day. I will run 1km further every week) for qualitative systems—like writing every morning with no word target, or running in a new enviro...

    published: 21 Jun 2017
  • Inside Out - Abstract Thought

    published: 29 Jun 2016
  • "Hey Bill Nye, What Advice Do You Have for Our Entire 8th Grade Engineering Class?"

    When an entire eighth grade engineering classroom asks Bill Nye a question, he delivers. The Question: What sort of advice does he have for these students? Bill begins by regaling algebra, everyone's favorite least-favorite subject. "Algebra can be challenging because it takes repetition," says Bill. "I’m sorry everybody. It sucked for me too." Moving forward, it's important to develop an extensive knowledge of mathematical operations and principles. You have to learn to visualize what you're creating before you create it. Finally, you must strive to hone your curiosity by taking risks. Of course, Bill acknowledges that these are eighth graders here. They've got plenty of time to get themselves ready to become the doers and shakers of the future. For now, the best advice is to learn to...

    published: 10 Nov 2015
  • Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

    Po-Shen Loh is a Hertz Foundation Fellow and Carnegie Mellon mathematics professor who thinks that history is a much harder subject than math. Do you agree? Well, your position on that might change before and after this video. Loh illuminates the invisible ladders within the world of math, and shows that it isn't about memorizing formulas—it's about processing reason and logic. With the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, Po-Shen Loh pursued a PhD in combinatorics at the Pure Math Department at Princeton University. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million i...

    published: 19 Mar 2017
  • Crystallized Vs. Fluid Intelligence

    Correction: Fluid intelligence is just the ability to think and reason abstractly. The higher your fluid intelligence, in theory, the faster and more efficient you become at thinking abstractly. One study shows that people with very high fluid intelligence have closer connections between neurons which allows them to reach conclusions faster. Another shows that the brain organizes itself in a more efficient manner allowing them to use less brain power to reach the same conclusions someone of lower intelligence would take longer to come to.

    published: 30 Dec 2010
  • Abstraction - Computational Thinking

    http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu Learn about what abstraction is and how it helps us to solve problems.

    published: 24 Feb 2016
  • Henry Rollins: The One Decision that Changed My Life Forever

    Don't miss new Big Think videos! Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Rollins describes the seminal moment when he decided to leave his job as manager of Haagen Dazs to become the lead singer of Black Flag. Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler and Elizabeth Rodd http://bigthink.com/

    published: 18 Jun 2012
  • Fluid Intelligence | Psychology | Chegg Tutors

    Fluid intelligence is the general ability to think abstractly, reason, identify patterns, solve problems, and discern relationships. Developed by Raymond Cattell and his student John Horn in the 1970s and 1980s, the concept is used in psychology to explain intelligence. Cattell theorized that fluid intelligence, often thought to depend on native ability rather than education or acculturation, is distinct from crystallized intelligence (acquired knowledge and skills relating to specific information). As an example of fluid intelligence, a person might learn to sew without prior experience or education in sewing. Some studies suggest that fluid intelligence declines after early adulthood; however, researchers disagree about how age affects fluid intelligence. Fluid intelligence is measured b...

    published: 22 Feb 2016
  • How formal clothes can impact our psychology

    What we wear can be a form of self-expression, but how much do your clothes reveal about you? A recent study finds that wearing formal clothing can actually enhance your ability to think abstractly. Heidi Grant Halvorson, social psychologist and author of “No One Understands You and What To Do About It,” joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss the study.

    published: 02 Jul 2015
  • The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone | TEDxOxford

    The theme for TEDxOxford in 2016 was “find X”. In his talk “the Science of Dubstep”, James Humberstone proposes that if this and future generations are going to “find X”, every nation needs to revolutionise education and develop cohorts of workers who can think abstractly. A composer, technologist, musicologist and music educator, Humberstone claims that music is the most abstract of all the arts and that technologically rich, culturally appropriate musical training could lead that educational revolution, turning the focus away from high stakes standardised testing and toward engaging and inspiring student-centred learning. Along the way he explains how incredible human perception of sound is, and composes a 12-tone dubstep song with the help of the TED audience! As a composer, technologi...

    published: 02 May 2016
  • Abstract Thinking

    Provided to YouTube by Dig Dis Abstract Thinking · JustMe Me Myself and I ℗ Zeitlos Music Released on: 2013-12-26 Composer Lyricist: Just Me Music Publisher: B79 Music Auto-generated by YouTube.

    published: 22 Nov 2013
  • Learning to Think Mathematically 1

    In this video, I show you how to reason mathematically, and ask questions. Everything is done within the context of a rectangle, so it's easy to visualize. Visit www.virtuallymath.com/demosession2/ To Get A Great Online Math Tutor! Learn how to build a powerful website today today. Purchase my online udemy.com course for only 100: https://www.udemy.com/buildapowerfulwebsitefast/ Learn C# Programming Today! This is a real skill that pays great. Use promo code : https://www.udemy.com/csharpbasics/?couponCode=YouTubePromo

    published: 30 Jul 2011
developed with YouTube
What is abstract thinking?

What is abstract thinking?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:04
  • Updated: 13 Oct 2016
  • views: 7415
videos
Andy McIntosh, Emeritus Chair in Thermodynamics and Combustion Theory, University of Leeds, answers the question "What is abstract thinking?" related to his talk "Science, Mathematics, and Beauty" given at the 2016 European Leadership Forum. - See more at www.FOCLonline.org FOCLID 7664_1
https://wn.com/What_Is_Abstract_Thinking
What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

What's the pattern here? - thinking with abstractions -- Linguistics & Logic 101

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:21
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2014
  • views: 9830
videos
How do you go from a concrete object like a basketball to an abstract idea like a circle? Why do you see the one and think about the other? What makes this kind of thing useful? Abstract thinking allows us to identify patterns and see common features. Once we abstract away the differences, we can group the similarities to come up with a new idea all its own. In just a few spare minutes, let's take a tour of the skills involved in this thought process and consider some practical applications. Text + video version: http://www.nativlang.com/logic/thinking-abstract.php Music by nativlang
https://wn.com/What's_The_Pattern_Here_Thinking_With_Abstractions_Linguistics_Logic_101
4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

4 Ways of Thinking About Abstract Objects - Philosophy Tube

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:26
  • Updated: 03 Oct 2014
  • views: 27688
videos
Are numbers, sets, colours and Hamlet really objects? Are they abstract? What does that mean? Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvoAL-KSZ32cX32PRBl1D4b4wr8DwhRQ4 Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube Suggested Reading: David Lewis, On The Plurality of Worlds That awesome comment from Critical Lit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzUrVeIdIBM&google_comment_id=z12awpzzbw3oitxby04cgtyifrnytpj5wfk If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to those who might not otherwise have access to it in exchange for credits on the show, please get in touch! Music: 'Show your Moves' and 'Pamgea' by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Any copyrighted material should fall under fair use for educational purposes or commentary, but if you are a copyright holder and believe your material has been used unfairly please get in touch with us and we will be happy to discuss it.
https://wn.com/4_Ways_Of_Thinking_About_Abstract_Objects_Philosophy_Tube
Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

Study Science, Think Abstractly, Change the World | Bill Nye

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:20
  • Updated: 23 May 2017
  • views: 26612
videos
What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and algebra specifically) to develop abstract thinking skills. #4. Find the field in which you belong, and start to chip away at change. Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/hey-bill-nye-what-if-im-not-a-science-person Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript: Caitlin: Hey Bill. I’m currently a junior in high school and I’m getting ready to apply to college in the near future. I’ve always loved science but it’s never been a subject to come naturally to me and I’ve always struggled in it a little bit. Do you think that there’s a possibility I could pick science as my major and become hopefully a scientist one day in the future despite the fact that it doesn’t come naturally to me? Thank you very much. Bill Nye: Caitlin, of course there’s a chance for you to become a scientist. What, are you kidding me? Of course, young woman, go for it! There’s all sorts of sciences that I bet will come naturally to you. Chemistry and physics may not be your thing, or maybe they’re your favorite. Statistics always made me crazy although I did it. So yes, there’s a science for you, you’re doggone right. I would please consider pursuing as many science courses as you can handle. You don’t have to start with 400-level courses, you know, senior in college level courses, just try astronomy. Astronomy is empowering and wonderful. It’s humbling and empowering all at the same time. Try biology. The discoveries being made in genetics right now are amazing and will change the course of human history. Try chemistry. Without chemistry we would not have these textiles and this fabulous glass in these electronics that are enabling us to have this computer conversation. No, just go for it, of course! The big thing I remind everybody though is algebra. Algebra is really important and it was hard for me too. You’ve just got to practice. You’ve got to practice algebra over and over. And the reason it’s valuable, apparently, research suggests thinking abstractly about numbers enables you to think abstractly about all sorts of things. So go back if you need to. If you’re a junior just do a little more algebra and I bet you’re more comfortable with the whole idea. And you might change the world. Go get 'em, Caitlin!
https://wn.com/Study_Science,_Think_Abstractly,_Change_The_World_|_Bill_Nye
Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

Understanding Math by Using Abstract Thinking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:15
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2010
  • views: 25970
videos
Professor Seff emphasizes that Understanding Math comes from the use of Abstract Thinking
https://wn.com/Understanding_Math_By_Using_Abstract_Thinking
Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

Getting smart - Episode two: abstract thinking part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:27
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2009
  • views: 7600
videos
Getting smart - abstract thinking part 1. The way of thinking abstract. This can be fun if you do it. This video is brought to you by http://www.slackhax.com
https://wn.com/Getting_Smart_Episode_Two_Abstract_Thinking_Part_1
Abstract vs. Concrete Thinking..CHECK IT OUT!

Abstract vs. Concrete Thinking..CHECK IT OUT!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:23
  • Updated: 08 Jun 2012
  • views: 3199
videos
This is a response to a video for a friend of mine subscribe to his channel below ✡ Jeff Brenner --http://goo.gl/pURdVb ✡ Subscribe to my channel! http://goo.gl/seB92J ✡Tweet me! http://www.twitter.com/yirmeyahu23 ✡ Email me! jayvon2305@yahoo.com
https://wn.com/Abstract_Vs._Concrete_Thinking..Check_It_Out
5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:30
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2016
  • views: 2982698
videos
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.
https://wn.com/5_Tips_To_Improve_Your_Critical_Thinking_Samantha_Agoos
Neil deGrasse Tyson: How to Teach Science? Leverage the Power of Pop Culture

Neil deGrasse Tyson: How to Teach Science? Leverage the Power of Pop Culture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:06
  • Updated: 09 Jul 2017
  • views: 48799
videos
Pop culture is a great way to frame new information. And a teacher like Neil can make a huge difference. Why spend hours explaining something in great detail when you can simply use what they already know? Pop culture is a great scaffold to build and hang information off of argues Neil deGrasse Tyson. For example: you need to understand basic laws of gravity in order to play Angry Birds, so why spend hours explaining Newton's Law when you can just fling a red bird at a pig? In this video, Neil uses a great anecdote about watching a football game and realizing that physics and science play a huge part in it whether the audience knows it or not. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/neil-degrasse-tyson-the-best-tactic-for-science-education-leverage-the-power-of-pop-culture Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I guess I'm lucky that my chosen profession is astrophysics because unlike so many other fields of study, especially academic fields of study, in my field we have an essentially completely transparent lexicon so I don't have to translate anything, hardly anything. If I show you a photograph of the sun and you see spots on the sun you say, "What do you call those?" And I say, "We call them sunspots." I show you a picture of Jupiter, "There's that red spot in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter what do you call that?" "We call that Jupiter's red spot." "There is this place for you to fall in and you don't come out and light doesn't escape what do you guys call that?" "Black hole." So I don't see myself translating anything. I don't have to. I celebrate discovery using all the language that is fundamental to my field and what it means is to the person listening they don't have to slog through, navigate through vocabulary to gain access to the interesting idea that's sitting on the other side of it. So let's take biology, for example. They discovered deoxyribonucleic acid. Now, if you don't know biology these are just syllables coming out of your mouth. Well, what is it? Well, it encodes to the identity of life and it's in the shape of a double helix. So fortunately - double helix - that's a word and there's nothing else really that's a double helix so that's kind of a translated term for deoxyribonucleic acid, but notice you spend all this time just getting through the word before you get to an understanding or a conversation about what it does and how it does it and why. So I'm lucky that my field does not have this lexicon challenge for the educator. But what I also do is I have come to recognize the obvious that everyone exists with a certain pop-culture scaffold that they carry with them. That's the definition of pop culture. So it's not everyone but it's most people. There's a common base of knowledge that we can all reference. We all know what football is in America. We know what we mean when we say football. What is baseball? Who is Beyoncé? Who is Donald Trump? Who is Hillary Clinton? What is the capital building? There are things we just know as part of pop culture. And I say hum, if you already know that then if I clad that… Once I've recognize that you are walking around with a pop-culture scaffold I can then clad that scaffold, if I think about how to do it, I can clad that scaffold with real and genuine science and you will care about it because I'm attaching it to something that I know in advance you already do care about or already do know about. Just as a quick example I was channel surfing, came across a football game that had just ended in a tie; they went into overtime. I had 15 minutes to kill before my movie came on. I said I'll sit there and watch this overtime period. And I'm watching it and there's the requisite exchange of possession before you go into sudden death overtime.
https://wn.com/Neil_Degrasse_Tyson_How_To_Teach_Science_Leverage_The_Power_Of_Pop_Culture
What is Abstract Algebra?  (Modern Algebra)

What is Abstract Algebra? (Modern Algebra)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:22
  • Updated: 07 Jul 2016
  • views: 104278
videos
Abstract Algebra is very different than the algebra most people study in high school. This math subject focuses on abstract structures with names like groups, rings, fields and modules. These structures have applications in many areas of mathematics, and are being used more and more in the sciences, too. ******** If​ ​you​’d​ ​like​ ​to​ ​help​ ​us​ ​make​ ​videos more quickly,​ ​you​ ​can​ ​support​ ​us​ on ​Patreon​ at https://www.patreon.com/socratica We​ ​also​ ​welcome​ ​Bitcoin​ ​donations!​ ​​ ​Our​ ​Bitcoin​ ​address​ ​is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 Thank​ ​you!! ************** We recommend the following textbooks: Dummit & Foote, Abstract Algebra 3rd Edition http://amzn.to/2oOBd5S Milne, Algebra Course Notes (available free online) http://www.jmilne.org/math/CourseNotes/index.html ************** Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss new lessons from Socratica: http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W You​ ​can​ ​also​ ​follow​ ​Socratica​ ​on: -​ ​Twitter:​ ​@socratica -​ ​Instagram:​ ​@SocraticaStudios -​ ​Facebook:​ ​@SocraticaStudios ******** Teaching​ ​Assistant:​ ​​ ​Liliana​ ​de​ ​Castro Written​ ​&​ ​Directed​ ​by​ ​Michael​ ​Harrison Produced​ ​by​ ​Kimberly​ ​Hatch​ ​Harrison
https://wn.com/What_Is_Abstract_Algebra_(Modern_Algebra)
The complete lack to think abstractly

The complete lack to think abstractly

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:44
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2013
  • views: 80
videos
A talk with my mom
https://wn.com/The_Complete_Lack_To_Think_Abstractly
The True Value of Coding: It Teaches You to Think Differently | Gene Luen-Yang

The True Value of Coding: It Teaches You to Think Differently | Gene Luen-Yang

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:32
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2017
  • views: 147236
videos
As a high school teacher for 17 years, Gene Luen-Yang experienced the highs and lows of teaching computer science. Initially offered as a standalone course at Bishop O’Dowd High School, where Luen-Yang taught, faculty came to believe that computer science was so essential that it be integrated into every subject. Still, interest in learning coding among students varied with market fortunes. When the dotcom bubble burst in the late 1990s, fewer students wanted to learn the zen of programming languages. That's a shame, says Luen-Yang, because more than an employable skill, coding is a gateway to using logic to solve large problems creatively. Read more at BigThink.com Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I was a high school computer science teacher for 17 years. I taught at Bishop O’Dowd High School in Oakland, California. I taught during the dotcom boom, I taught during the dotcom bust, and I taught during sort of the recovery of the tech industry afterwards, and I did see the interest in what I was teaching fluctuate. It would go up and down every year largely tied to the economy, which was a little bit weird to me. And even as a school, you know, when I began to teach in the late 90s the school itself actually had a computer requirement. You were required to take a certain number of computer classes before you were allowed to graduate. They got rid of that requirement. They got rid of that requirement because at some point they felt like computer literacy was so important that it ought to be integrated in all the other subjects. So it shouldn’t be a thing in and of itself. So in the beginning I agreed with that. But after seeing how it played out I don’t think it was as effective as we wanted it to be, you know. I think that computers are still a fairly specialized type of knowledge, computer science. And teachers today still—I don’t think we’ve been trained on how to integrate computer science well into the other subjects. So ultimately what ended up happening at that school site was we would graduate students who would know how to use computers but would not necessarily understand how they worked or even understand how to maximize what they could get out of the computer. As a computer science teacher, something I used to talk to parents about—especially during the dotcom bust when interest in my class started to evaporate— Coding is not about training students how to type into a computer. That’s the least of it. Coding is actually really about training students to think in a certain way. It’s about training students to take large and complex problems and break them up into small pieces. It’s about training students to take things that are vague, that are difficult to wrap your mind around, and putting them into concrete sequential steps. And that sort of thinking, that sort of skill, that sort of mental skill is applicable no matter what you do in life, you know. What you’re talking about right now, about how the future economy is going to require more knowledge work—we don’t know what computers are going to look like, right? We don’t know, we don’t even know what coding is going to look like. But I can guarantee you that the coding mentality, the type of thinking that’s required in order to code well that will become increasingly valuable as we go on. I think logic is really important. I think when you teach kids computer science you are touching on a lot of principles of logic. And in terms of students knowing how to use computers but not necessarily understanding why they work, I think that’s largely a product of the success of the computer field, you know. Within computer science there’s this idea of abstraction, where you separate the interface of something from the internals of it. And that’s something that I talked about in my computer science classes when I was teaching. You do that because it makes the computer itself, it makes whatever you’re making easier to use, right? The user just has to have like a working mental model of what the interface looks like. They don’t have to know anything about the guts underneath. But unfortunately what you miss out on in that is the mental development in your thinking that comes with understanding the guts, right? When you understand the guts it’s not just for using that tool, it’s actually to change what’s inside of your skull. It’s actually to change your brain. It makes you a better thinker. It makes you a better problem solver to understand those things. So I think there’s a place—I think there’s a place for abstraction, but my hope is that every student, before they graduate from high school they’ll have a chance to wrestle with those guts, to be able to really understand how a computer works from the inside. How both software and hardware work from the inside.
https://wn.com/The_True_Value_Of_Coding_It_Teaches_You_To_Think_Differently_|_Gene_Luen_Yang
Goal Setting Is a Hamster Wheel. Learn to Set Systems Instead. | Adam Alter

Goal Setting Is a Hamster Wheel. Learn to Set Systems Instead. | Adam Alter

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  • Duration: 3:50
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2017
  • views: 428678
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You've just achieved a goal you've been working towards for two years. You did it! Congratulations. Someone asks you: how does it feel? "Kind of anti-climactic, actually," you say. This scenario is quite common among those who have achieved even the highest benchmarks in business, athletics, or art, says Adam Alter, and it's because the goal setting process is broken. With long-term goals particularly, you spend the large majority of the time in a failure state, awaiting what could be a mere second of success down the track. This can be a hollow and unrewarding process. Alter suggests swapping quantitative goals (I will write 1,000 words of my novel per day. I will run 1km further every week) for qualitative systems—like writing every morning with no word target, or running in a new environment each week—that nourish you psychologically, and are independently rewarding each time you do them. Adam Alter is the author of Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/adam-alter-want-to-succeed-dont-set-goals-set-systems Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript: Goal setting is fascinating because it's sort of a broken process in many respects. This is the way a goal works: You say to yourself, “When I achieve (whatever the thing is), that's how I'll know I'll have succeeded, and I'm going to do everything I can to get to that point as quickly as possible.” What that means is you exist in a failure state for a long time until you reach that goal, if it's a long-range goal. And so as you evaluate your process all you get is the negative feedback of not having achieved that goal. Perhaps as you move closer to it there's some positive feedback, but if the goal is really the end state that you're seeking out, there's a lot of failure before you get there. And now here's the thing: when you do get there it's a massive anti-climax. So there are people who achieve the highest highs; people who achieve the highest highs in athletics, in business, and if you talk to them and you ask them to describe what it's like to reach their goals they say things like, “I got there and it was an incredible anti-climax. The minute I got there I had to start something new, I had to find a new goal.” And that's partly because there's something really unsatisfying about the moment of reaching the goal. Unless it has its own benefits that come from reaching the goal, if it's just a sort of signpost; that doesn't do much for us, it doesn't nourish us psychologically. And what that ends up meaning is that we have to try to find something new. So really if you look at life as a series of goals, which for many of us it is, it's a period of being unsuccessful in achieving the goal, then hitting the goal, then feeling like you haven't really got much from that goal, going to the next one—and it's a sort of series of escalating goals. A really good example of this is, say, smart watches or Fitbits or exercise watches. People, when they get those watches, a lot of them hit on the number 10,000. “I want to walk 10,000 steps.” When you do that, the thing will beep; you'll feel pretty good about it for a minute but then that feels a little hollow and the goal escalates over time. People will describe going from 10 to 11 to 12 to 14,000 steps to the point where they're moving through injuries, through stress-related injuries, because the goal is there; they respond to the goal more than they do to their internal cues, and basically there's something really unfulfilling about that. The reason the goal keeps escalating and becoming more and more intense is because when they achieve the goal they don't actually get anything for that achievement, and so goals, generally I think, are in many ways broken processes. I think part of the problem with goals is that they don't tell you how to get to where you're going. A better thing to do is to use a system. So the idea behind a system rather than a goal is that a system is saying things like, “I’m a writer, my goal is to finish writing this book but I'm not going to think about it in that way. Eventually I'll have 100,000 words, but my system will be that for an hour every morning I will sit in front of my computer screen and I will type. It doesn't matter what that looks like. I'm not going to evaluate the number of words. I'm not going to set some benchmark, some artificial number or benchmark that I should reach, what I'm going to do is just say, 'Here's my system: an hour a day in front of the screen. I'll do what I can—bam.'”
https://wn.com/Goal_Setting_Is_A_Hamster_Wheel._Learn_To_Set_Systems_Instead._|_Adam_Alter
Inside Out - Abstract Thought

Inside Out - Abstract Thought

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  • Duration: 3:12
  • Updated: 29 Jun 2016
  • views: 967366
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https://wn.com/Inside_Out_Abstract_Thought
"Hey Bill Nye, What Advice Do You Have for Our Entire 8th Grade Engineering Class?"

"Hey Bill Nye, What Advice Do You Have for Our Entire 8th Grade Engineering Class?"

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  • Duration: 2:18
  • Updated: 10 Nov 2015
  • views: 27790
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When an entire eighth grade engineering classroom asks Bill Nye a question, he delivers. The Question: What sort of advice does he have for these students? Bill begins by regaling algebra, everyone's favorite least-favorite subject. "Algebra can be challenging because it takes repetition," says Bill. "I’m sorry everybody. It sucked for me too." Moving forward, it's important to develop an extensive knowledge of mathematical operations and principles. You have to learn to visualize what you're creating before you create it. Finally, you must strive to hone your curiosity by taking risks. Of course, Bill acknowledges that these are eighth graders here. They've got plenty of time to get themselves ready to become the doers and shakers of the future. For now, the best advice is to learn to love learning. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/bill-nye-inspires-aspiring-engineers Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript: Chris: Hi Bill. I’m Chris and this is my eighth grade engineering class and I was wondering if you have any advice for aspiring engineers. Bill Nye: This is great. You have an eighth grade engineering class. That’s so cool. I did not have anything that cool. But here’s a couple of pieces of advice. First of all learn algebra. Algebra can be challenging because it takes repetition. I’m sorry everybody. It’s hard for me too. You’ve just got to do these problems over and over until you’re good at them because apparently being able to think about numbers abstractly – this is to say you have letters representing numbers and their relationships – that allows you or enables you to think abstractly about all sorts of things. And in engineering what we do is solve problems and make things. And in order to make things I believe you have to envision it at some level. You have to have a sense of what something’s going to look like or how it’s going to perform or how it’s pieces will interact whether it’s an airplane landing gear or an amazing piece of software, a bit of code that somebody’s written, that you’ve written. You want to be able to envision how they interact. So algebra’s really important and that will lead to calculus and this mythic thing called second order differential equations which are just so wonderful. But there’s no hurry on that. Then the other thing is try stuff. Just make things. And of course be careful. Just bear in mind it’s not that hard as humans to make things that will injure yourself. And I’m not joking. You can sharpen a knife or you can cut your finger. But if you work with a knife that’s too dull then you’re actually more likely to cut your finger. So just remember to take chances, try things but be safe. And make that part of the process. And then you guys you’ve got to clean up. And if you’ve made a mess you’ve got to clean up. But man you’re taking engineering in eighth grade. That is fantastic. Solve problems and make – use science to solve problems and make things. Way to go you guys. Thank you.
https://wn.com/Hey_Bill_Nye,_What_Advice_Do_You_Have_For_Our_Entire_8Th_Grade_Engineering_Class
Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

Anyone Can Be a Math Person Once They Know the Best Learning Techniques | Po-Shen Loh

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  • Duration: 3:53
  • Updated: 19 Mar 2017
  • views: 412147
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Po-Shen Loh is a Hertz Foundation Fellow and Carnegie Mellon mathematics professor who thinks that history is a much harder subject than math. Do you agree? Well, your position on that might change before and after this video. Loh illuminates the invisible ladders within the world of math, and shows that it isn't about memorizing formulas—it's about processing reason and logic. With the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, Po-Shen Loh pursued a PhD in combinatorics at the Pure Math Department at Princeton University. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million in Hertz Fellows since 1963 (present value) and supported over 1,100 brilliant and creative young scientists, who have gone on to become Nobel laureates, high-ranking military personnel, astronauts, inventors, Silicon Valley leaders, and tenured university professors. For more information, visit hertzfoundation.org. Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/po-shen-loh-says-anyone-can-be-a-math-person-if-they-know-the-best-learning-techniques Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I think that everyone in the world could be a math person if they wanted to. The keyword though, I want to say, is if they wanted to. That said, I do think that everyone in America could benefit from having that mathematical background in reasoning just to help everyone make very good decisions. And here I'm distinguishing already between math as people usually conceive of it, and decision making and analysis, which is actually what I think math is. So, for example, I don't think that being a math person means that you can recite the formulas between the sines, cosines, tangents and to use logarithms and exponentials interchangeably. That's not necessarily what I think everyone should try to concentrate to understand. The main things to concentrate to understand are the mathematical principles of reasoning. But let me go back to these sines, cosines and logarithms. Well actually they do have value. What they are is that they are ways to show you how these basic building blocks of reasoning can be used to deduce surprising things or difficult things. In some sense they're like the historical coverages of the triumphs of mathematics, so one cannot just talk abstractly about “yes let's talk about mathematical logic”, it's actually quite useful to have case studies or stories, which are these famous theorems. Now, I actually think that these are accessible to everyone. I think that actually one reason mathematics is difficult to understand is actually because of that network of prerequisites. You see, math is one of these strange subjects for which the concepts are chained in sequences of dependencies. When you have long chains there are very few starting points—very few things I need to memorize. I don't need to memorize, for example, all these things in history such as “when was the war of 1812?” Well actually I know that one, because that's a math fact—it was 1812—but I can't tell you a lot of other facts, which are just purely memorized. In mathematics you have very few that you memorize and the rest you deduce as you go through, and this chain of deductions is actually what's critical. Now, let me contrast that with other subjects like say history. History doesn't have this long chain, in fact if you fully understand the war of 1812 that's great, and it is true that that will influence perhaps your understanding later of the women's movement, but it won't to be as absolutely prerequisite. In the sense that if you think about the concepts I actually think that history has more concepts than mathematics; it's just that they're spread out broader and they don't depend on each other as strongly. So, for example, if you miss a week you will miss the understanding of one unit, but that won't stop you from understanding all of the rest of the components. So that's actually the difference between math and other subjects in my head. Math has fewer concepts but they're chained deeper. And because of the way that we usually learn when you had deep chains it's very fragile because you lose any one link—meaning if you miss a few concepts along the chain you can actually be completely lost. If, for example, you're sick for a week, or if your mind is somewhere else for a week, you might make a hole in your prerequisites. And the way that education often works where it's almost like riding a train from a beginning to an end, well it's such that if you have a hole somewhere in your track the train is not going to pass that hole.
https://wn.com/Anyone_Can_Be_A_Math_Person_Once_They_Know_The_Best_Learning_Techniques_|_Po_Shen_Loh
Crystallized Vs. Fluid Intelligence

Crystallized Vs. Fluid Intelligence

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  • Duration: 5:21
  • Updated: 30 Dec 2010
  • views: 30166
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Correction: Fluid intelligence is just the ability to think and reason abstractly. The higher your fluid intelligence, in theory, the faster and more efficient you become at thinking abstractly. One study shows that people with very high fluid intelligence have closer connections between neurons which allows them to reach conclusions faster. Another shows that the brain organizes itself in a more efficient manner allowing them to use less brain power to reach the same conclusions someone of lower intelligence would take longer to come to.
https://wn.com/Crystallized_Vs._Fluid_Intelligence
Abstraction - Computational Thinking

Abstraction - Computational Thinking

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  • Duration: 2:29
  • Updated: 24 Feb 2016
  • views: 7973
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http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu Learn about what abstraction is and how it helps us to solve problems.
https://wn.com/Abstraction_Computational_Thinking
Henry Rollins: The One Decision that Changed My Life Forever

Henry Rollins: The One Decision that Changed My Life Forever

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  • Duration: 7:07
  • Updated: 18 Jun 2012
  • views: 2268080
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Don't miss new Big Think videos! Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Rollins describes the seminal moment when he decided to leave his job as manager of Haagen Dazs to become the lead singer of Black Flag. Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler and Elizabeth Rodd http://bigthink.com/
https://wn.com/Henry_Rollins_The_One_Decision_That_Changed_My_Life_Forever
Fluid Intelligence | Psychology | Chegg Tutors

Fluid Intelligence | Psychology | Chegg Tutors

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  • Duration: 5:15
  • Updated: 22 Feb 2016
  • views: 5565
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Fluid intelligence is the general ability to think abstractly, reason, identify patterns, solve problems, and discern relationships. Developed by Raymond Cattell and his student John Horn in the 1970s and 1980s, the concept is used in psychology to explain intelligence. Cattell theorized that fluid intelligence, often thought to depend on native ability rather than education or acculturation, is distinct from crystallized intelligence (acquired knowledge and skills relating to specific information). As an example of fluid intelligence, a person might learn to sew without prior experience or education in sewing. Some studies suggest that fluid intelligence declines after early adulthood; however, researchers disagree about how age affects fluid intelligence. Fluid intelligence is measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). ---------- Psychology tutoring on Chegg Tutors Learn about Psychology terms like fluid intelligence on Chegg Tutors. Work with live, online Psychology tutors like Jake W. who can help you at any moment, whether at 2pm or 2am. Liked the video tutorial? Schedule lessons on-demand or schedule weekly tutoring in advance with tutors like Jake W. Visit https://www.chegg.com/tutors/Psychology-online-tutoring/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_content=managed&utm_campaign=videotutorials ---------- About Jacob W., Psychology tutor on Chegg Tutors: University of South Florida, Class of 2016 Biomedical Sciences, Psychology major Subjects tutored: Psychology, Biomedical Science, Basic Math, ACT (math), ACT (English), ACT (reading), Basic Science, Cognitive Science, ACT (science), Literature, SAT (math), Writing, Statistics, Biology, Geometry, Pre-Algebra, Chemistry, Algebra, English, and SAT (reading) TEACHING EXPERIENCE I was the class tutor all throughout most of my primary and secondary schooling. I was usually called on to help my friends and classmates understand the concepts we were learning in class. Currently, I help my study groups with understanding the concepts which are taught in our classes. EXTRACURRICULAR INTERESTS I enjoy learning. I usually fulfill this by searching for little pearls of knowledge about history, science, medicine, and psychology. I am also an avid reader. Nearly all my free time is spent on one of these two outlets. I am also currently working in a Computational Drug Design lab as an undergraduate research assistant. Want to book a private lesson with Jake W.? Message Jake at https://www.chegg.com/tutors/online-tutors/Jake-W-887199/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_content=managed&utm_campaign=videotutorials ---------- Like what you see? Subscribe to Chegg's Youtube Channel: http://bit.ly/1PwMn3k ---------- Visit Chegg.com for purchasing or renting textbooks, getting homework help, finding an online tutor, applying for scholarships and internships, discovering colleges, and more! https://chegg.com ---------- Want more from Chegg? Follow Chegg on social media: http://instagram.com/chegg http://facebook.com/chegg http://twitter.com/chegg
https://wn.com/Fluid_Intelligence_|_Psychology_|_Chegg_Tutors
How formal clothes can impact our psychology

How formal clothes can impact our psychology

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  • Duration: 4:17
  • Updated: 02 Jul 2015
  • views: 5124
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What we wear can be a form of self-expression, but how much do your clothes reveal about you? A recent study finds that wearing formal clothing can actually enhance your ability to think abstractly. Heidi Grant Halvorson, social psychologist and author of “No One Understands You and What To Do About It,” joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss the study.
https://wn.com/How_Formal_Clothes_Can_Impact_Our_Psychology
The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone | TEDxOxford

The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone | TEDxOxford

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  • Duration: 18:07
  • Updated: 02 May 2016
  • views: 283208
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The theme for TEDxOxford in 2016 was “find X”. In his talk “the Science of Dubstep”, James Humberstone proposes that if this and future generations are going to “find X”, every nation needs to revolutionise education and develop cohorts of workers who can think abstractly. A composer, technologist, musicologist and music educator, Humberstone claims that music is the most abstract of all the arts and that technologically rich, culturally appropriate musical training could lead that educational revolution, turning the focus away from high stakes standardised testing and toward engaging and inspiring student-centred learning. Along the way he explains how incredible human perception of sound is, and composes a 12-tone dubstep song with the help of the TED audience! As a composer, technologist and teacher, James Humberstone believes that music education can lead all education through the challenges of the 21st Century. After all, there is no more experiential, creative, child-centred subject than music – or so he claims. A trained ‘classical’ composer, James migrated to Sydney, Australia in 1997 and has also worked in the fields of music software, education (with children and adults of all ages), and as a musicologist. Today he is a lecturer in music education at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, and remains an active composer. His recent musical output included a permanent electro-acoustic installation at the Australian National Maritime Museum on board a retired destroyer and a submarine. In 2016 James is collaborating on a Hip Hop album, and composing a song cycle. He has also just released the University of Sydney’s first (free) MOOC, “The Place of Music in 21st Century Education” at www.coursera.org. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/The_Science_Of_Dubstep_|_James_Humberstone_|_Tedxoxford
Abstract Thinking

Abstract Thinking

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  • Duration: 6:35
  • Updated: 22 Nov 2013
  • views: 25
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Provided to YouTube by Dig Dis Abstract Thinking · JustMe Me Myself and I ℗ Zeitlos Music Released on: 2013-12-26 Composer Lyricist: Just Me Music Publisher: B79 Music Auto-generated by YouTube.
https://wn.com/Abstract_Thinking
Learning to Think Mathematically 1

Learning to Think Mathematically 1

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  • Duration: 24:32
  • Updated: 30 Jul 2011
  • views: 6257
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In this video, I show you how to reason mathematically, and ask questions. Everything is done within the context of a rectangle, so it's easy to visualize. Visit www.virtuallymath.com/demosession2/ To Get A Great Online Math Tutor! Learn how to build a powerful website today today. Purchase my online udemy.com course for only 100: https://www.udemy.com/buildapowerfulwebsitefast/ Learn C# Programming Today! This is a real skill that pays great. Use promo code : https://www.udemy.com/csharpbasics/?couponCode=YouTubePromo
https://wn.com/Learning_To_Think_Mathematically_1